Greek philosopher Heraclitus once said “No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man”. In my mind fewer quotes were as applicable to continual travel as that. Each time you travel, you return a changed person (if you return at all that is), and when you get (or make) the opportunity to travel again, you and the world in which you travel will have both changed drastically. The world will certainly change you, and with the right amount of luck and passion you will help change the world. The fact is simple, you have joined the ranks of people who will never stop traveling.

Even the most seasoned globetrotters struggle with the insatiable appetite that comes with wanderlust, and it never gets any easier. Taking that first travel can become both a blessing and a curse, and since the high is intoxicating as any drug, enter your first travel experience with blissful caution—you won’t come back the same. This isn’t to come back off as conceited or arrogant, but if it 100% true. Long-term travelers know it well—they are all too familiar with the day dreams of other countries, the small and not-so-small quirks of cultures that their home culture lacks, and the longing to pangs of desire to return to travel.

The trouble lies in staying present while not traveling, while in between the ecstasies of life on the road. While it’s easy to maintain being in the moment when you are inundated with new activities, people, food, and currency, it’s much more impressive to maintain that excitement when you are surrounded with the sights, smells, tastes, and sounds that you are familiar with. It’s just as easy for continuous travelers to get caught up in living for the next excursion as it is for workaholics to get caught up in working for the weekend. But to bookend this rambling thought with words from much wiser men, French absurdist philosopher Albert Camus once said “There is scarcely any passion without struggle”. This is the struggle. This is the passion.